California Dreamin' with Amy Witt

Team Roping + Fashion

with Amy Witt

Ropers Sports News is proud to introduce a new monthly column written by aspiring journalist and fashionista Amy Witt, Porterville, Calif. “Besides team roping, I eat, sleep, and breathe fashion. Not only do I have a strong sense of knowledge and education in the fashion industry, I have been active in the western/rodeo industry for more than seven years, winning national and state championship titles. I am a designer for Wrangler as well, and have an up and coming clothing line, Cowboy Fresh. Team roping and fashion is what I do!”

Amy Witt

I am obsessed with turquoise jewelry. It’s not an obsession really... it holds beauty and signifies who I am. German, Dutch, Mexican, and some Cherokee Indian is the makeup of who I am while I feel like my Indian heritage is my soul and spirit. Traveling to rodeos and ropings since I was a young girl, I started collecting turquoise from all over California, and as an adult, all over the United States. I now proudly have a collection that is very special to me. My collection ranges from pieces dating back to the 1940’s, from Cowboy and Indian museums in Paso Robles, Calif., and places all over the world.

They are a must have! From wins to losses, love, fun, and even heartbreaks, they are with us every step of the way. They can make us feel on top of the world and frankly, we cannot function without them. It’s fun to try to figure out why some fads shoot for the moon and others fall down in the gutter. With some, there is no rhyme or reason for their sudden burst, and they usually fade as fast as they appear. But I must say, cowboy boots will never be a fad.
Legend has it that cowboy boots can be traced back to Genghis Khan, who was the emperor of the Mongol Empire, who wore distinctive red boots with wooden heels. England, 17th and 18th century, displayed riding boots with high tops and stacked heels. Then there was the first Duke of Wellington, who defeated Napoleon at Waterloo in 1815, wearing calf-length boots with a low heel, Arthur Wellesley. The Wellington’s made it easy to mass produce in the 1860’s. Wellington boots were preferred by soldiers during the U.S. Civil War, and when the war ended in 1865, soldiers proudly took their boots home. America later ushered in the era of the cowboy and the cowboy boots have made their statement we love and know today.