Breaking It Down


Speed Williams

By Speed Williams
speedroping.com

Now is the time of year when people are struggling to make the top 15 and qualify for the National Finals Rodeo. Whether it’s the NFR or anywhere you’re competing, it’s crucial to learn how to overcome a negative mindset when things have not gone according to plan. You have to be able to lie to yourself. If you miss four or five and failed, when you back in the box on the next one you must have the mindset that you were outstanding on the previous run.

By Speed Williams
speedroping.com

The thing that will let you be most successful in roping, regardless of ability level, is being able to consistently catch your cattle. I see so many people who practice trying to make a fast run, when their time would be better spent trying to make clean runs on challenging cows. The first and last cow of the day is very important and I encourage my students to treat them like a high teamer they need to be under 11 seconds on, and try to make a clean run.

By Speed Williams
speedroping.com

I just got home from teaching a clinic at Josh Allen’s in Quincy, Washington. The first two days were for beginners and the second two days were open to anyone. Teaching new people always drives home the importance of fundamentals, effective practice, and the importance of understanding your weaknesses.

You can practice three times a week and run 15-20 steers each session and, unless you have a specific purpose for your practice, your number will be the same 10 years from now.  I know guys who have roped for 20 years and have never improved or had their number raised. 

By Speed Williams
speedroping.com

One of the biggest challenges to being successful in rodeo is keeping your horses working. When Rich and I started roping together we had a difference of opinion on this subject. I would only ride my good horses, Bob and Viper, at the bigger rodeos. I normally used my third, fourth, and fifth string horses at the smaller rodeos that didn’t pay as well.