Breaking It Down


Speed Williams

By Speed Williams
speedroping.com

We just got home from the USTRC Finals in Fort Worth and I’m happy to say they had a huge turnout. There were 300 to 400 add-on teams in most ropings. Some of the ropings paid $30,000 to $40,000 for $200 or $300 entry fees. When you have over 500 teams in a roping there are a lot of variables that need to happen in your favor to be successful. My son started roping in the #16, heeling for Kaleb Driggers, and roped all the way down to the #9 where he headed. Hali roped in the #14 down and heeling in the #9 and #8. We never made it to the short round.

By Speed Williams
speedroping.com

Last year my wife and kids went to the All Star Finals at the Lazy E and had a great time. I was unable to go as I had lessons scheduled. My wife said it was one of the more enjoyable ropings they had been to. The Lazy E has been around a long time and remains state-of-the-art and one of the nicest facilities available, along with a friendly atmosphere. I was told by my family the All Star Finals would be put on my calendar for this year. Tim Victory, the producer, called and asked if Rich and I would be interested in matching Jake and Clay. Though I haven’t been competing for the last few years due to injuries, I told him I was up for whatever the rest of them wanted to do.

By Speed Williams
speedroping.com

Lately I’ve found myself teaching a lot of beginner headers. For them, the answer is easy. They need to learn to rope right to left… first. When you rope both horns at the same time, you’re throwing straight forward and turning your thumb down. It’s like learning to put English on a cue ball before learning how to shoot a straight shot. For me, most of the steers I’ve headed have been both horns at the same time. But I can also run close, rope right to left, and catch a big horned steer that steps into me.

By Speed Williams
speedroping.com

One thing my father instilled in me was you never drove by a truck and trailer on the side of the road without stopping to see if they need help. I’ve been many, many miles in my career and have stopped many times and also been broken down and received help. That’s what this story is about.